The 600T Externally

A jaunt around the externals of the Corsair Graphite Series 600T reveals something a little more curvaceous than we've come to expect from modern enclosures. Outside of the Cooler Master Cosmos the 600T seems to take at least one or two design cues from (as good a place as any), most cases tend to have sharp angles and very few curves. The 600T on the other hand features rounded edges around most of the design. By the same token, while most cases tend to be shades of black or silver, the 600T employs a gunmetal coloring that suits it well.

We'll start from the front and work our way around. The 600T features four external 5.25" bays but surprisingly no 3.5"; it's safe to assume Corsair figures you can always adapt a front panel card reader (or your ancient floppy drive) to fit in a 5.25" bay. The entire front of the case is ventilated, and the panel in front of the massive 200mm intake fan pops off, allowing you to clean the grate and dust out of the fan. That 200mm fan (and its brother in the top of the case) is the source of some consternation in other reviews: it's quiet, but it doesn't seem to move that much air, and I know some reviewers found the bright white LED lighting a little obnoxious. That's definitely going to be a matter of taste.

When we crawl up the front to the top of the case, we see one of the major progressions in modern cases: the I/O, power, and reset buttons are at the top front of the 600T. It's a smart move since most of us tend to keep our cases on the floor these days. Corsair offers a healthy selection of I/O here: a generous four USB 2.0 ports, microphone and headphone jacks, a 6-pin Firewire port, and something of a rarity right now: a USB 3.0 port. That USB 3.0 port doesn't use the USB 3.0 header that's been showing up on some recent motherboards, though; it's powered by an extension cable that routs to the back of the case and plugs into the motherboard's I/O cluster. This isn't the most elegant solution in the world, but it gets the job done and it's flexible enough that you can always just plug it into a rear USB 2.0 port if your board doesn't support 3.0 and get a fifth front port. If I had one complaint about the I/O cluster, though, it's the inclusion of Firewire but not eSATA. I use both but if I had to make a choice for the average user, I'd err on the side of eSATA.

Parked in the middle of all these ports is the 600T's integrated fan controller. If you've read any other reviews of the 600T, allow me to reiterate what they said: this thing just doesn't seem to do that much. If you plug in all of the fans in the case (the controller is actually completely independent of the case fans and you can choose to avoid using it entirely), you will find that the difference between the lowest and highest settings is like night and later that night. You'll only hear the difference in a quiet room, and as you'll see later, the highest setting doesn't appreciably improve cooling performance.

Speaking of which, the top of the case has a second removable grate covering the second 200mm fan, this one an exhaust. Again, this grate is easy to remove but also fairly secure.

The rear of the case reveals the exhaust fan, a more standard 120mm affair, along with two important distinctions. First, Corsair outfits the case with eight expansion slots instead of seven. It's a small but noteworthy inclusion that makes the case well-suited to multi-GPU systems. Second is the increasingly common bottom-mounted power supply. The power supply's cooling is essentially completely cut off from the rest of the system, and there's a vent in the bottom of the case (with a removable filter) for the power supply's fan. This isn't a problem either; the case is built on a raised base that keeps all but the shaggiest of carpeting from clogging up the vent.

Finally on the sides we have one of my favorite features of the 600T: as you'll find when we check out the internals, the 600T is a largely tool-less affair, and the side panels are very secure but use latches that pop them right off. It's a nice change of pace from having to slide the side panel back on and then secure it, even with thumbscrews, to the back. These panels make getting into and out of the 600T an absolute breeze.

Introducing the Corsair Graphite Series 600T Inside the 600T
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  • kevith - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    The review I was thinking of is actually this, from Phoenixlights post earlier:

    http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/cases/2010/09/23/...

    It is however some very stiff competition the 600T is up against in that review, and the coolest results are achieved with all fans at full speed, which is a bit noisier than I prefer. I use my machine mainly for pre-studio music recording, so although I´m not requiring total silence, a certain upper level of noise is important.

    And since You can run that kind of hardware, my Athlon II X2 and HD 4770 will probably have real good chances of staying both frosty and whispering.

    So I think I will in fact do it. My old Zalman GS1000 is a bit big, has no dust filters, and I´ve really had to tinker to get the noise down.

    And there is nothing like a new affair, is there...?

    Thanks for the reply and all the great articles over the years.
    Reply
  • Phoenixlight - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    Just as an alternative the Fractal Design Define R3 is a quieter case with better cooling and is considerably cheaper whilst retaining excelllent cable management. Reply
  • kevith - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    Welll, after checking out reviews - and comparisons - one more time, I can see your point. And one case, that also have given me dreams of love affairs, the Raven RV02, is also considered a better buy in terms of both cooling and noise.

    It really is a jungle out there, and it´s not all that easy being Tarzan with all those Jane´s around

    I still consider the 600T by far the prettiest to my taste, but looks aren´t everything.

    Thanks for the inputs
    Reply
  • Phoenixlight - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    Yeah the RV02 is a good case and has been recently upgraded by Silverstone with Air Penetrator 181 fans which cool about 4*C better but it's slightly more expensive now and is a very deep case. Reply
  • King Crimson - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    Fuck Martha Stewart. :-) Reply
  • Conficio - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    I really like the USB ports at the top of a case. My Lian Li 60 has a small flap at teh bottom, which lasted about a year and then broke. Anything put in there is in danger of brakage sooner or later.

    That said, looking at the USB port panel, it is far from ideal:
    * The ports are very close together. It become shard manage multiple USB drives in those ports.
    * Now I have ports but a fan grill and roundes surfaces (if I look at the pictures right). Would it be not much more practical to have a flat surface? Preferrably flat surfaces with an anti skid coating, so that I can place my external hard drive, iPod, Sports GPS, ... right on that surface.
    * Also give me some clips or ties on that top surface (velcro?) so that I can manage the cables (USB in the front and power from the back) right there. Or may be some similar double layer panel with rubber grommets to hide the cables even more.

    Other than that this looks like a great case.
    Reply
  • boe - Friday, November 26, 2010 - link

    I love the fact that finally some case makers are making cases for people who have long video cards! I can tell you many of the things I like but there is only one thing that really bugs me about this case. I wish it had an optional mounting for a 120mm fan to improve airlfow are around the slots.

    My video card generates a great deal of heat but so do SSD PCIe cards and sound cards. If you SLI or CF your video cards the cards tend to be tight together making adequate airflow challenging. I'm not saying they need to include a side 120mm fan but it would be nice if I didn't have to take a dremel to a new case just to make it have better airflow for a heavily loaded system.
    Reply
  • poohbear - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    really need to buy corsair stocks, this company is so on the ball in every segment they enter, premium stuff that is done so keenly.

    Definitely gonna buy this case, so convenient and user friendly, and gorgeous to boot!
    Reply
  • dubyadubya - Saturday, November 27, 2010 - link

    The 600T is a nice case but Corsair fails in one important area as do all other brands as far as I know. Computer cases should have more intake CFM than exhaust CFM. This creates a positive case pressure. In a positive pressure case dust is not pulled though optical drives and every other opening in the case. USB ports, audio ports etc. Easily cleanable low restriction air filters should also be included and engineered into the design of the case. Because no company seems to do it right I tend to by cheap cases and mod the piss out of them to create a positive pressure case myself. Reply
  • hangfirew8 - Monday, November 29, 2010 - link

    I sort of agree, though I shoot for neutral pressure, either way the 600T needs a lot more input area than it, or most any case provides.

    While I agree with deleting the case side fan for the sake of quiet, what we are left with makes no sense at all. Other than CPU, where does most of the heat come from in a big gaming case. The big Video card or cards. Where are all the fans on this case? Up near the CPU, which has more than twice as much exhaust as it needs. The video cards have the front fan sort of blowing on them, through drive cages, and if we flip the P/S fan right-side-up we get to roast the power supply in Video Heat juices.

    Sooner or later SOMEONE will get it right. We need a Rear Exhaust fan near the video cards. Both sound and heat go out the back and away from the user, quietly. That might mean moving the P/S back up top, or just making a taller case.

    In the mean time, people will have to do things that seem to make no sense- like setting all fans to input- because any change is better than what we are getting from our current crop of silent gaming cases, which is to say roasted video cards and power supplies.
    Reply

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