Among the items touched upon by AMD in today’s earnings release, CEO Dr. Lisa Su’s prepared remarks included a brief update on AMD’s GPU product roadmap.

For those of you wondering where AMD’s mobile Radeon RX 6000 (Navi 2x) parts are, you shouldn’t be waiting too much longer. At the start of this year AMD announced that RDNA2 mobile products would be launching in the first half of the year, and on today’s call, Dr. Su has confirmed that this is still the case. At this point the company is expecting the first notebooks using its mobile-suitable GPUs to launch later in the quarter – which means that the hardware itself should be shipping to OEMs and ODMs soon.

Overall, AMD is continuing to ramp production of GPUs in what continues to be a tight environment for 7nm production capacity at TSMC, as well as the packaging AMD’s advanced chips require. Today’s financial release didn’t include any further information on when additional (mid-range) desktop video cards would launch, but those are expected on a similar time scale as AMD’s mobile parts.


AMD CES 2021

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  • Spunjji - Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - link

    @TheinsanegamerN - You *know* I'm not talking about "hobbyist" miners here. Why pretend otherwise, other than to be smug?

    I don't have facts to back it up because they don't exist. You probably also know this, which is why you haven't brought any to the discussion yourself. I'm admitting to the limitations of my knowledge, you're being a smug dipshit. QED.
    Reply
  • aebiv - Thursday, April 29, 2021 - link

    Generally, trying to discuss things with folks who are concerned about the "common good" instead of what is just "good" is a waste of time... Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - link

    @aebov - Okay then, ignore the "common good" and whatever you assumed I meant by that, because from context it's clear it's different from what I mean. Crypto mining is just not "good". Happy now? 🤷‍♂️ Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Sunday, May 9, 2021 - link

    Video gaming is a waste of power.
    Drag racing is a waste of power.
    Television is a waste of power.
    Movies are a waste of power.
    Driving to visit relatives is a waste of power.

    etc.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - link

    @Oxford Guy - you know slippery slope arguments aren't persuasive, right? I'm not making the argument that all things that use power are bad, I am specifically making the argument that a system that was designed to burn power in order to provide the illusion of value is a shitty system. Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - link

    Valid analogies would be:
    Leaving your TV on all day with nobody watching is a waste of power.
    Revving an engine all day and going nowhere is a waste of fuel.

    You and our insane gamer friend seem to have a similar affection for false equivalences, rubbish rhetorical strategies, and unjustified faith in your own reasoning abilities.
    Reply
  • Dug - Thursday, May 6, 2021 - link

    I think you need to look up how much energy is used for mining. It's not even close to all of the computers running games. Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - link

    @dug The only estimates I've seen that came close to reasonable suggested the two are more similar than I thought, although I have valid reason to seriously doubt the numbers for PC gaming. They assume that everyone is gaming using relatively high-powered desktop computers and large monitors, but even Steam stats alone debunk that - the majority of PC gamers play on potato systems. Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Sunday, May 9, 2021 - link

    'Torn between my dislike of the Chinese government's authoritarian bullshit and my dislike of miners.'

    Neither of which lie at the heart of the problem, as I have explained numerous times.
    Reply
  • Spunjji - Tuesday, May 18, 2021 - link

    @Oxford Guy - it may help if I clarify that my initial comment had nothing to do with component supply or video gaming, and everything to do with my *instinctive reaction* to news that the Chinese government are clamping down on crypto miners, based on my mutual (and no, not equal) dislike of both of those entities.

    So much straw has been flung around since then that I can understand it might be difficult to perceive my intent.
    Reply

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