Monitors are getting exciting. Not only are higher resolution panels becoming more of the norm, but the combination of different panel dimensions and feature sets means that buying the monitor you need for the next 10 years is getting more difficult. Today Acer adds some spice to the mix by announcing pre-orders for the XB280HK – a 28-inch TN monitor with 3840x2160 resolution that also supports NVIDIA’s G-Sync to reduce tearing and stuttering.

Adaptive frame rate technologies are still in the early phases for adoption by the majority of users. AMD’s FreeSync is still a few quarters away from the market, and NVIDIA’s G-Sync requires an add-in card which started off as an interesting, if not expensive, monitor upgrade. Fast forward a couple of months and as you might expect, the best place for G-Sync to go is into some of the more impressive monitor configurations. 4K is becoming a go-to resolution for anyone with deep enough wallets, although some might argue that the 21:9 monitors might be better for gaming immersion at least.

The XB280HK will support 3840x2160 at 60 Hz via DisplayPort 1.2, along with a 1 ms gray-to-gray response time and a fixed frequency up to 144 Hz. The stand will adjust up to 155mm in height with 40º of tilt. There is also 120º of swivel and a full quarter turn of pivot allowing for portrait style implementations. The brightness of the panel is rated at 300 cd/m2, with an 8 bit+HiFRC TN display that has a typical contrast ratio of 1000:1 and 72% NTSC. VESA is also supported at the 100x100mm scale, as well as a USB 3.0 Hub as part of the monitor, although there are no monitor speakers.

The XB280HK is currently available for pre-order in the UK at £500, but will have a US MSRP of $800. Also part of the Acer XBO range is the XB270H, a 27-inch 1920x1080 panel with G-Sync with an MSRP of $600. Expected release date, according to the pre-orders, should be the 3rd of October.

Source: Acer

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  • fade2blac - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    *Correction: 1440p @ 23.5" is ~125 PPI, 1440p @ 21.5 is ~ 137 PPI Reply
  • eddman - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    For gaming. I could get a sharp picture without AA.

    Also, since 4k is 4 times 1920 x 1080, I could set the resolution to 1920 x 1080 in heavy games and it'd still scale well. It look be as nice with 2560 x 1440 display.

    Another reason for wanting a smaller display; gaming on a PC with a big display isn't comfortable, because you sit close to the display.

    The whole picture is in my face and I get disoriented.

    The solution would be to sit further away, but then I can't reach the mouse and keyboard comfortably.

    I sometimes resort to switching to a lower resolution w/o scaling, like 1600 x 900, so that I get a smaller picture.
    Reply
  • eddman - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    @anandtech
    This is 2014. Improve this damn comment system. Is it too much to ask for an edit function?!
    -------------------------------------------

    *It won't be as nice with 2560 x 1440 display.
    Reply
  • Impulses - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    If your mouse/keyboard distance is a problem too it sounds like you might need a new desk as much as a new display... :p Reply
  • eddman - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    You raised a good point, actually.

    That's the problem. I can't get a deeper desk (is that how you say it?). I have a very small room.
    Reply
  • otherwise - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    Pretty much no market for it. It's too big for a laptop and most high end desktops these days won't settle for less than 24" or 27". Reply
  • thewhat - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    Partly technical, because a lot of software still doesn't have proper scaling. And partly market, because a lot of consumers don't know scaling exists and just assume everything would be tiny. Reply
  • SunLord - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    Will see 23" 4k monitors in a few years as they shrink down just like it took time for 1080p monitors to filter down to 23" and smaller when they first came out. Reply
  • BD2003 - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    If the ROG swift can do 1440p/144hz over DP 1.2, surely this can as well?

    I think I could live with having the choice between 1440p/144hz and 2160p/60hz g-sync, but if it's only g-sync mode is 2160p/60hz, than that's a real shame.
    Reply
  • ant6n - Friday, September 19, 2014 - link

    I'd prefer 21:9 as well. Reply

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