If one were critiquing AMD’s current line of Zen 2 processors, one of the things to note is that the cheapest option is $199, for the six-core Ryzen 5 3600. This puts the latest hardware from AMD out of reach for anyone building a gaming $900 system or below. In order to redress this balance, AMD is set to launch two new quad core designs in May, starting at $99. The new Ryzen 3 hardware will each feature one Zen 2 core chiplet, run at up to 4.3 GHz, and offer PCIe 4.0 connectivity.

A few years ago, the quad core processor was at the top of the market, and you would need $500 for one. When AMD started launching its quad core parts for as little as $99, the market became interested in what would become the new normal. These new Ryzen 3 parts from AMD, the new low-end quad cores, are helping define that normal, especially with high frequencies and taking advantage of the latest features such as high-speed DDR4, Zen 2 levels of IPC at high frequencies, and PCIe 4.0.

AMD 'Matisse' Ryzen 3000 Series CPUs
AnandTech Cores
Threads
Base
Freq
Boost
Freq
L2
Cache
L3
Cache
PCIe
4.0
Chiplets
IO+CPU
TDP Price
(SEP)
Ryzen 9 3950X 16C 32T 3.5 4.7 8 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 1+2 105W $749
Ryzen 9 3900X 12C 24T 3.8 4.6 6 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 1+2 105W $499
Ryzen 9 3900 12C 24T 3.1 4.3 6 MB 64 MB 16+4+4 1+2 65W OEM
Ryzen 7 3800X 8C 16T 3.9 4.5 4 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 1+1 105W $399
Ryzen 7 3700X 8C 16T 3.6 4.4 4 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 1+1 65W $329
Ryzen 5 3600X 6C 12T 3.8 4.4 3 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 1+1 95W $249
Ryzen 5 3600 6C 12T 3.6 4.2 3 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 1+1 65W $199
Ryzen 5 3500X 6C 6T 3.6 4.1 3 MB 32 MB 16+4+4 1+1 65W OEM
Ryzen 3 3300X 4C 8T 3.8 4.3 2 MB 16 MB 16+4+4 1+1 65W $120
Ryzen 3 3100 4C 8T 3.6 3.9 2 MB 16 MB 16+4+4 1+1 65W $99

This is all well and good, and AMD has plenty of options at these price points to compete against Intel, however AMD’s biggest competition is going to be with itself. At these prices, $105 and $120, there are a number of AMD processors from the previous generations on offer that might be more appealing. For example, the 12nm+ version of the Ryzen 5 1600, called the ‘AF’ because the processor descriptor ends in AF, has slightly lower frequencies and IPC but has six cores and is only $85. Users will have to decide between more cores for throughput with the 1600AF, or more frequency/IPC with the 3100 for $15.

Not only this, but we are also awaiting the launch of AMD’s new APUs, called Renoir, for the desktop space. The performance of these parts at 15 W, a quad-core Zen 2 up to 4.3 GHz with Vega8 graphics (and no extra latency due to the chiplet) is going to be a compelling option when it moves to 65 W on the desktop. As a result, we might see the Renoir processors priced above the Ryzen 3, in that $125-$190 area that AMD currently doesn’t have any Zen 2 processors in.

For the rest of the year it seems there’s going to be some interesting competition in this low cost space. Intel also has Comet Lake-S on the horizon we believe, taking another crack at 14nm, and these new Ryzen 3 products might result in some interesting line-ups due to price.

We're expecting to get these CPUs in for testing sometime soon. They are set to be launched in May.

B550 Launch Coming Soon

One of the often talked topics, since January, is when AMD is going to launch its more mid-range B550 motherboards for the Ryzen 3000 processors. Today AMD is announcing that B550 is coming on June 16th this year, with all the main motherboard manufacturers coming out with a variety of models, up to 60 for launch. AMD is also confirming that B550 will offer PCIe 4.0 connectivity. More details to come at a later date.

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  • Hul8 - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    Better read it again. They stated that Ryzen had an IPC advantage. Reply
  • Hul8 - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    *has Reply
  • Alistair - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    current i3 from Intel is horrid, you're not staying over 60 fps in BL3 for example, and even Overwatch will ping the CPU at 100 percent and drop from 200 to 60 fps... Intel badly needs the hyperthreading and clock speed increases coming next month (8350k is absolute garbage) Reply
  • shirleymarquez - Saturday, May 2, 2020 - link

    AMD has its APUs for that market, and I'm guessing that we'll see 4000 series APUs when production of the new 7nm APU die catches up with demand and they have some they can spare from the laptop market. These new parts are for budget gaming systems that include a graphics card. Reply
  • V3tt3k1ll3r - Friday, April 24, 2020 - link

    Rumors have been going around about 10th gen i3's may be coming with 4c/8t on their higher i3. I still believe out of the box ryzen will take the lead, but not by much. The main advantage is ryzen 3 is budget minded. 120$ for a 3.8/4.3 ghz 8 thread with good ipc is hard to beat. I would imagine Intel i3 4c/8t will be 165-195$ just my thoughts. Reply
  • Irata - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    TLB bug ? Didn't it affect Phenom I processors, so we are talking about an issue affecting CPU from 2007 ? Reply
  • toaste - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    Lol yes, the earlier Phenom K10 revs. That was five (5) complete CPU core architectures ago for AMD.

    Not just stepping changes with small IPC improvements and power features, but 5 completely new architectures: K10 -> K11/12 -> Bobcat -> Bulldozer/Piledriver/Steamroller/Excavator family -> Jaguar/Puma -> Zen/Zen+/Zen2 family.

    May as well knock Intel for "don't divide, Intel Inside" rather than the plethora of IME and speculative execution issues and the resulting need for patches with devastating performance hits.
    Reply
  • Threska - Sunday, April 26, 2020 - link

    *shrug* People are still stuck on what Microsoft did years ago, so why should CPUs be different? Reply
  • Mastakony - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    Irony or sarcasm : great value Reply
  • yankeeDDL - Tuesday, April 21, 2020 - link

    Actually the first benchmarks show that the i3 are completely smashed by Ryzen 3, in terms of pure performance, in terms of performance per Watt and performance per dollar. It's a wipeout. The i3 draw huge peak powers even when not overclocked: I can't imagine how much it would cost to consistently run those things hot. Reply

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